from the “wrote it and forgot it” archive…

In the process of cleaning up some old files and projects, I came across a track which, to be completely honest, I blanked when I first played it.  This turns out to be a good thing for me, however: it was from a time when I produced a lot concept work for a project.  I was rapidly and somewhat effortlessly spinning out lots of ideas, a distinct contrast to my usual sparse, monolithic, intensely focused efforts, spaced out like tiny and unforgettable oases in an otherwise boring desert. Here’s what I found, by the way — just a rough concept … Continue reading from the “wrote it and forgot it” archive…

Soundtrack Sunday: Gabriel Yared (“The English Patient”)

Seeing The English Patient in the 1930s Lyric Theatre in Blacksburg, VA enveloped me in the dawn-of-WWII era portrayed in the film.  I was nineteen and thoroughly captivated; the sensual imagery of the film and its poignant score, wrapped up in the time-halting Art Deco walls of the Lyric, made an inedible and surreal impression on me. I suppose The English Patient was the Doctor Zhivago of my generation, and comparisons between the two have been invited… although in this review, as with many others, there’s not a single mention of Gabriel Yared’s Oscar-winning (1996) score.  Why?  Filmtracks.com more or … Continue reading Soundtrack Sunday: Gabriel Yared (“The English Patient”)

“Revolver” reviewed

I’ve been listening to the Beatles’ seventh album Revolver a great deal lately.  The piano effects in “Good Day Sunshine” were what initially led me to rediscovery, but there are so many other gems on the album. I was vaguely aware of the Beatles’ transition to an all-studio band, but what I didn’t realize is that Revolver marked a major paradigm shift in the Beatles’ recording style.  The entire background story and the reasons they were able to basically camp out in Abbey Road for three months, captured in this review by Scott Plagenhoef for Pitchfork, are fascinating keystones of … Continue reading “Revolver” reviewed

Headshrinker music for National Geographic Channel

I had a great time writing these three tracks to accompany a Headshrinker web app on the National Geographic Channel website.  Built by Neo-Pangea and part of the “Expedition Week” digital campaign, the app allowed you to upload a picture, wrap it over a three-dimensional shrunken head, add some gruesome decorations and finally preview and share it while enjoying the choice of an ambient rainforest track and three musical selections (provided by yours truly).

Who shrunk my head?

Track One: Headshrinker “Movie” — inspired by the first scenes of Raiders of the Lost Ark.  Love East-West’s creepy string samples!

Continue reading “Headshrinker music for National Geographic Channel”